Several states have sought to control increasing non-economic awards by implementing compensation caps for these types of damages. Most of these compensation caps directly address medical malpractice issues where malpractice premiums rose to a level to become disincentives for physicians to practice. The tort reform of non-economic damages was intended to ameliorate this situation and protect doctors and health facilities from exorbitant damages. However, advocates against caps argue that caps unduly penalize those victims who may require a level of damages to compensate for lifelong losses that can never be regained.

Damages from pain and suffering are, therefore, subjective. There is no formula and certainly no standardized calculation for pain and suffering. It is the job of the jury (or the judge if there is no jury) to determine what is fair and reasonable, which they will often do based on their own life experiences. The jury will consider whether the plaintiff is credible and sympathetic. This subjectivity means that damages from pain and suffering can vary tremendously from case to case -- even if the underlying injury is the same.
X. The medical practitioners at times also have to be saved from such a class of complainants who use criminal process as a tool for pressurizing the medical professionals/hospitals particularly private hospitals or clinics for extracting uncalled for compensation. Such malicious proceedings deserve to be discarded against the medical practitioners. XI. The medical professionals are entitled to get protection so long as they perform their duties with reasonable skill and competence and in the interest of the patients. The interest and welfare of the patients have to be paramount for the medical professionals.
I think one of the reasons people end up being channelled into the clutches of ambulance-chasing lawyers is the often bewildering NHS complaints system, at times a frustratingly slow and impersonal process. But in almost all cases, you can air grievances, and resolve disputes, quickly, with the minimum amount of fuss, without paying a penny – and here’s how...
The emotional toll that misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis has on a patient can be severe. Imagine a patient that is told they have cancer. They may have endured surgery, chemotherapy and radiation treatments only to find out later that the diagnosis was wrong. Not only has this patient suffered physical pain and possible damage to their body, but the emotional aspect of the ordeal can leave permanent scars.
When pursuing a claim against a doctor or hospital specifically, there may be “caps on damages.” This means that if a jury awards $10 million for pain and suffering in a medical malpractice case, a judge may be required by law to reduce that award to $250,000 or $500,000. These limits on non-economic damages vary from state and state, and will not always apply. Frequently catastrophic injuries, such as paralysis, brain injuries, or severe injuries to children, are allowed a higher limit. However, the caps do not generally apply to the portion of a monetary award meant for past and future medical care, lost income, or other financial losses.

There is no definitive answer, as all cases are different. There are a number of factors that can affect the timelines. First, a case that has multiple parties involved will require much more investigation than a single case. There are depositions, a commitment of experts and the court's schedule to consider. In addition, the insurance company may settle without going to court or the company may try to postpone a court date as long as possible.
In most cases, only the primary physician (your doctor) can be sued for misdiagnosis. In rare cases, other health care professionals may also be liable if their negligence caused or contributed to the patient’s harm -- including nurses, lab techs, and any specialists who may have seen the patient. The hospital or health care facility where the doctor practices usually cannot be sued for harm caused by misdiagnosis. That’s because most doctors are independent contractors, not employees of the hospital, so the facility can’t be held legally responsible for the doctor’s negligence.    

Medical malpractice cases must be brought soon after the injury. In most states, you must bring a medical malpractice claim fairly quickly -- often between six months and two years, depending on the state. (The time period in which you must bring the lawsuit is called the "statute of limitations.") If you don't file the lawsuit within the specified period of time, the court will dismiss the case regardless of the facts.
For example, your neighbor started a fire on purpose in your garage with the intent to kill you. If you started having panic attacks that led to fainting, you might have a case. In this type of situation, the physical injury is a direct result of emotional distress. But if an employer screams and makes threats at an employee, this might not count as outrageous conduct. Even if it's rude and insensitive, it might not count as emotional distress.[2]
Every incident of misdiagnosis is not considered medical malpractice. In order for a misdiagnosis to be labeled as medical malpractice, the plaintiff must be able to prove that the doctor was negligent. This means the plaintiff must show that another doctor would have been able to accurately diagnose the victim’s condition under similar circumstances.

If you think you’ve been a victim of medical negligence at a hospital, you should speak to a lawyer as soon as possible. The statute of limitations, or the legal timeframe in which one can bring a medical negligence suit, begins once the injury is known or should have been known. The Florida statute of limitations for medical malpractice claims is generally 2 years-absent some exceptions that can extend the period up to 4 years or 8 years for infants.


Another reason that misdiagnosis happens is a faulty lab result or test. Errors in test results can happen because of flawed equipment or human error. In some cases, a technician who administers the test inappropriately, or a secondary doctor who misreads a scan, resulting in a doctor making an incorrect diagnosis, can be held liable. If the hospital staff makes a mistake, the hospital can be held directly liable.
Special damages are damages that one can easily place a monetary value on, like medical expenses or lost wages.These are the injured’s out of pocket expenses. Since these types of economic damages can be easily calculated (i.e exact amount of medical bills or exactly how much time missed from work multiplied by wage), they are often the more easy to obtain damages.
If you or someone you love believes that you could have a lawsuit against a hospital for negligence or malpractice, we invite you to contact the Chicago hospital lawyers at Power Rogers & Smith, L.L.P. today. We’ll review the details of your situation at no cost to you and explain your legal rights and options. Should you choose to contact us and should we end up taking your case, we will walk you through the process so you can know what to expect. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

The study recommended reforming the system by increasing funding for legal services, so attorneys could be compensated for their time; making defendants who lose a case pay the plaintiff’s attorney fees; or sending malpractice complaints to an administrative system with neutral adjudicators and medical experts so patients wouldn’t need an attorney. 


The doctor was negligent. Just because you are unhappy with your treatment or results does not mean the doctor is liable for medical malpractice. The doctor must have been negligent in connection with your diagnosis or treatment. To sue for malpractice, you must be able to show that the doctor caused you harm in a way that a competent doctor, under the same circumstances, would not have. The doctor's care is not required to be the best possible, but simply "reasonably skillful and careful." Whether the doctor was reasonably skillful and careful is often at the heart of a medical malpractice claim. Almost all states require that the patient present a medical expert to discuss the appropriate medical standard of care and show how the defendant deviated from that standard.
When pursuing a claim against a doctor or hospital specifically, there may be “caps on damages.” This means that if a jury awards $10 million for pain and suffering in a medical malpractice case, a judge may be required by law to reduce that award to $250,000 or $500,000. These limits on non-economic damages vary from state and state, and will not always apply. Frequently catastrophic injuries, such as paralysis, brain injuries, or severe injuries to children, are allowed a higher limit. However, the caps do not generally apply to the portion of a monetary award meant for past and future medical care, lost income, or other financial losses.

The personality of the plaintiff, their witnesses and overall effect of the injuries which befell the victim plaintiff will play a powerful role in any damage award if damages are even awarded once liability issues are satisfied. The power and personality of the lawyer representing her or his client also may factor into a high money damage award case.


There are rare occasions where doctors or other medical service providers will admit they have made a mistake and will seek to come to some kind of settlement with an injured party. Tread lightly in these situations, as you may be trading a quick resolution for a substantially lower amount of compensation. However, in cases that are not particularly serious -- specifically, cases worth $20,000 or less -- you may find that settling directly with a doctor is possible.
website: https://www.prslaw.com/ Copyright © , Power Rogers & Smith, L.L.P. The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.
If you think you’ve been a victim of medical negligence at a hospital, you should speak to a lawyer as soon as possible. The statute of limitations, or the legal timeframe in which one can bring a medical negligence suit, begins once the injury is known or should have been known. The Florida statute of limitations for medical malpractice claims is generally 2 years-absent some exceptions that can extend the period up to 4 years or 8 years for infants.
Several states have sought to control increasing non-economic awards by implementing compensation caps for these types of damages. Most of these compensation caps directly address medical malpractice issues where malpractice premiums rose to a level to become disincentives for physicians to practice. The tort reform of non-economic damages was intended to ameliorate this situation and protect doctors and health facilities from exorbitant damages. However, advocates against caps argue that caps unduly penalize those victims who may require a level of damages to compensate for lifelong losses that can never be regained.

Suing a hospital for misdiagnosis is dependent on whether the doctor is an employee of the hospital. A hospital is liable for all damage committed by their employees once the employee is performing his/her duties. The principle of employer’s liability states that any act or omission by the employee in the course of their employment which causes loss, damage or suffering can be attributed to the employer. Therefore, once the doctor was an employee of the hospital then all his/her acts or omissions are attributed to the hospital. However, if the doctor was an independent contractor of the hospital that is where the hospital does not have any control in how the doctor carries out his functions but the doctor’s only responsibility is that he ought to perform the duties under his contract at the standard required; then the hospital is not liable. Where the doctor sets his own fees and work hours then he is not an employee.
My Dad was an elderly, and he was killed by the misuse of an off-label medication that was contraindicative for his medical conditions. The harm was totally preventable. After Dad’s death, we talked to 20+ attorneys. 99 percent of them said there was malpractice and the doctor was negligent. But because of my Dad’s age and the lack of future earning, no attorney was willing to take my Dad’s case on contingency.
Significantly, your attorney can only use these examples of loss to illustrate your injuries if you provide it to him or her. If your case is in litigation you will most likely sit for a deposition (your testimony given under oath before a court reporter who is taking down questions directed to you by the defense attorney and your responses). In preparing for your deposition, your attorney may ask you to explain how this accident has affected your life. Be ready to give real life examples so that your attorney can best advocate on your behalf.
Another potential cause of action is intentional infliction of emotional distress. This is based on a doctor’s outrageous conduct that intentionally or recklessly causes a patient to suffer severe emotional distress. This must be beyond a mere slight as it must be something that would outrage society. The common law tort required a physical manifestation of injury, but most jurisdictions no longer require this element. This cause of action has been successful in some cases in which patients recorded their doctors performing medical treatment while mocking and ridiculing the patient to a serious degree.
I had the same issue after my daughter passed from medical harm. I did at one point have a signed contract with an attorney. He had a friend in the medical field that he felt could review her 2,500 pages of medical records. However, when his friend explained that because she was an infant who went in for heart surgery, you'd require two specialists to review my daughter’s chart and testify. I was told it would cost roughly $50,000 to $75,000 per specialist. This doesn't include normal costs for the attorney. It didn't take long for the attorney to send me a letter stating he couldn't help me. I added that letter to the other dozen all stating we had a good case, but the financial limits made it impossible for them to take it. It was business.
Medical professionals are required by law to uphold an appropriate standard of care as outlined by the laws in the state in which they practice medicine. While the vast majority of doctors accomplish this goal, some fail to do so and a patient is seriously injured as a result. The following is an overview of how an injured patient can seek compensation from the negligent doctor who hurt them. If you have suffered an injury in this manner, contact a personal injury attorney today to learn what options you have under the law.
However, bringing a lawsuit is not for everyone. Weigh your options. If your fear of “looking bad” to family or friends outweighs your desire to bring a malpractice suit against your doctor for an injury he caused you or a loved one, bringing a suit may not be the best option for you. On the other hand, if your need or want to bring suit against your doctor outweighs your fear, taking action against your physician may be the right choice for you.
If you believe that you have suffered injuries as a result of a misdiagnosis, it’s important to move quickly to take legal action. California law states that plaintiffs must file a lawsuit within one year after they discover or should have discovered the injury or within three years after the date of the injury, whichever comes first. This may seem like a significant amount of time, but it will pass by very quickly if you are attempting to recover from your injuries. Therefore, it’s strongly recommended that you get in touch with an attorney right away to discuss your case.

Certainly, anyone who travels internationally could foresee a circumstance leading to medical treatment abroad. Automobile accidents, heart attacks, illness, and other unexpected medical emergencies can occur overseas during travel, just like they do at home. Moreover, the concept of “medical tourism” is popular with millions of Americans. Medical tourism refers to people that visit a country other than their own for medical treatment. Sometimes, people go abroad to seek treatment, such as a particular drug for a particular disease, that is not permitted in the United States. Other instances include people visiting countries that have well-trained doctors who can perform surgeries, both elective and otherwise, at a cost much less expensive than in the United States. In fact, savings can be as much as 88%, even after factoring in the cost of travel!


Whether the doctor lived up to the standard of care will likely require an expert opinion. One of the issues the expert will examine is the defendant doctor's differential diagnosis method. When trying to diagnose a patient, a doctor makes a list of diagnoses in order of probability and tests them by asking the patient questions, making further observations of the patient, or ordering tests. The goal is to rule out diagnoses until there is only one diagnosis remaining. However, in many instances, a doctor learns more information that requires him or her to supplement the list with other potential diagnoses.

Medical professionals are required by law to uphold an appropriate standard of care as outlined by the laws in the state in which they practice medicine. While the vast majority of doctors accomplish this goal, some fail to do so and a patient is seriously injured as a result. The following is an overview of how an injured patient can seek compensation from the negligent doctor who hurt them. If you have suffered an injury in this manner, contact a personal injury attorney today to learn what options you have under the law.
I was recently abruptly terminated by my employer of 17 years. I worked for a relatively small (25-30 employees), family-owned, manufacturing company in a niche market, in the position of general manager for the past 10, and was responsible for distributor relations, trade shows, etc for the entire 17. Without any warning, I was terminated via text message in December. I didn't have the opportunity to speak with any of the customers that I had formed relationships with over the years, to clear out my office of 17 years of accumulated personal belongings, or to even speak with anyone regarding my termination. I was sent a letter from an attorney representing the company instructing me that I was not to attempt to contact the company directly. My belongings were (literally!) thrown into a couple of boxes (picture frames and momentos were broken), and shipped to my home - I live 2 miles from the company. A friend - still employed there, noticed some of my personal things; including a 5x7 school photo of my family, in the trash, and retrieved it and other items to return to me, but had to leave the soiled items in the trash. I have no record of disciplinary problems nor any reason to have anticipated any of this. I feel stripped of my dignity, my reputation, my friends. I went from making $75,000 yr to less than $400 wk on unemployment. Since my termination I understand that the a family member of the owner has taken over many of the responsibilities that had been mine, leading me to believe that this was likely the motive, and while I understand family ties and obligations, and realize that no labor laws have been broken, it was done maliciously, knowing the devastation it would cause to me.
I was an RN and suffered serious and permanent harm from my cancer surgery. There were many errors, including my waking up during surgery, life-threatening infection, internal sutures that did not dissolve, renal failure, a collapsed lung after hospital discharge, abscesses and wound dehiscence. Years later, I am homebound and unable to work. I would be making $80-100,000/year now or more but am stuck barely above poverty on Social Security Disability. Since I and the various insurances have spent over $2 million for my care, and I do not have enough money to obtain all the care and medications I need, I am very unhappy. I have a potential new abscess now. It is a living horror, and the cancer may return. I am always in pain. No attorney would take my case. Even the failure to diagnose the cancer for years, with facts right there for every doctor I went to with my symptoms, isn't actionable. I am however, alive.
How can you prove that a reasonable doctor would have reached a different conclusion? First, it’s important to understand the concept of differential diagnosis. Doctors use a system called differential diagnosis when diagnosing their patients. After evaluating the patient, the doctor is supposed to make a list of conditions that match the patient’s symptoms and rank them based on how likely it is the patient has the condition. Then, it is up to the doctor to eliminate conditions off of this list until he is only left with one, which will end up being what he diagnoses the patient with. To eliminate other conditions on the list, the doctor must order tests, asked detailed questions about symptoms, examine the patient’s medical history, or refer the patient to specialists.

With constant improvements in transportation technology, along with massive decreases in the cost of international travel, the old saying that “the world is getting smaller” is truer than ever before. The wealthy have long enjoyed the benefits of international travel, but now “average” Americans can easily travel, too. Moreover, companies like SpaceX and Boeing envision a future in which you can travel almost anywhere in the world in less than an hour.
To establish whether or not your doctor has been negligent they will have to be shown to have been in a position where they owed you/the patient a duty of care and that you or the patient suffered direct harm as a result of their negligent management of this care. The decisions the doctor made and the treatment they gave will be assessed. If it is found that they acted in a way in which other doctors would not have acted, and this resulted in a negative effect, you will have grounds to make a successful medical negligence claim.

For example, John Smith went to his local doctor because he had a black spot on his foot and his leg was painful.  His doctor sent him to a surgeon who suggested a special procedure using a needle inserted into his leg artery to see whether the veins in John’s foot were blocked.  The surgeon botched the procedure and John’s artery was damaged.  Several weeks later John’s leg had to be amputated.  When John consulted a lawyer and the lawyer investigated his claim, the lawyer found that John’s original foot condition was gangrene and he was always going to have to have his leg amputated, so the surgeon’s negligence in performing the procedure did not leave John worse off than he would otherwise have been and he fails the test of causation.
To file a certificate of merit you must first contact an expert, usually another physician. This expert will review your medical records and certify that the original health care provider deviated from accepted medical practices, which resulted in your injuries. The attorney that you hire will now file the certificate of merit, which confirms that you spoke with a medical expert and that your action has merit.
One example might be a person who survives a car crash in Knoxville in which a loved one dies. If the plaintiff can prove negligence, then any mental or emotional suffering resulting from the accident might be a recoverable damage. Seeing a loved one killed in an accident would traumatize anybody, but not every case of emotional distress will be so clear.
In addition, the fact that you like your doctor doesn’t actually mean that he’s any good at what he does. It would be a mistake to let your doctor get away with malpractice if he is exercising a poor quality of care. Remember: the fact that he’s a nice guy doesn’t mean he’s a competent physician. Don’t you want to receive compensation for your injury or the injury of a loved one and possibly keep him from injuring someone else?
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