In the example above, emotional stress would include the plaintiff’s embarrassment or depression as a result of disfigurement. Likewise, the plaintiff would be compensated if the jury finds that the plaintiff has suffered a permanent loss of function or impairment from the jaw bone injury. The jury would also be permitted to consider the loss of ability of enjoy life’s pleasures such as eating or even kissing. Note that this requires proof of what the plaintiff did and what they enjoyed before the injury. A jury can also consider the expected length of the plaintiff’s life, lifestyle habits, and whether the plaintiff was generally healthy before the incident to determine how much to award.

Emotional distress lawsuits can be tricky to win especially when their is no tangible evidence of suffering from the plaintiff. For such cases, it is hard to prove unless the plaintiff is convincing, backed by evidence, that the conduct of the defendant was extreme and outrageous. Lawsuits falling under the category of emotional distress are split into two different types:
The emotional toll that misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis has on a patient can be severe. Imagine a patient that is told they have cancer. They may have endured surgery, chemotherapy and radiation treatments only to find out later that the diagnosis was wrong. Not only has this patient suffered physical pain and possible damage to their body, but the emotional aspect of the ordeal can leave permanent scars.
I think this is absolutely the right decision. As $15 million sounds like a lot of money, because it really is, this patient and her family are completely changed now. Her life might end because of the doctor’s negligence. There is no price for human life; no amount of money can possibility bring a life back. That is why the large award is to pay for all of her treatment, medical bills, and anything else that can help to rectify the mistakes by her doctor. This also serves as a deterrent to her doctor and radiologist and others as well to make sure they properly do their job and, when in doubt, as for a second opinion.
VII. Negligence cannot be attributed to a doctor so long as he performs his duties with reasonable skill and competence. Merely because the doctor chooses one course of action in preference to the other one available, he would not be liable if the course of action chosen by him was acceptable to the medical profession. VIII. It would not be conducive to the efficiency of the medical profession if no Doctor could administer medicine without a halter round his neck.
The patient must prove that they suffered pain, lost wages, have costly medical bills, or have experienced a significant loss in the quality of their life or in their ability to live independently because of the misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis. Compensation for pain and suffering may be available to the patient in addition to compensation for their physical injuries.
Mike Broemmel began writing in 1982. He is an author/lecturer with two novels on the market internationally, "The Shadow Cast" and "The Miller Moth." Broemmel served on the staff of the White House Office of Media Relations. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism and political science from Benedictine College and a Juris Doctorate from Washburn University. He also attended Brunel University, London.
An award for pain and suffering is not obtainable unless your injuries reach at least 15% of a most extreme case.  There is, however, no set way of measuring what 15% of a most extreme case looks like so every injured person must be individually assessed by the Judge and a percentage decided.  The maximum award for pain and suffering is about $612,500.00 and is indexed each year to keep pace with inflation.
A violation of the standard of care - The law acknowledges that there are certain medical standards that are recognized by the profession as being acceptable medical treatment by reasonably prudent health care professionals under like or similar circumstances. This is known as the standard of care. A patient has the right to expect that health care professionals will deliver care that is consistent with these standards. If it is determined that the standard of care has not been met, then negligence may be established.

I have been seen about 6 times for UTI ( bladder infection) Each time all my symptoms have been the same, but three days later (after they treat me for the bladder infection) the culture comes back negative. Finally today they said it could possibly be Bladder Cancer. I have had all the symptoms of bladder cancer and no body has ever taken the time to test me. So in all can i sue for them not looking more into this throughout the past two years when all these problems started happening? Since it could be cancer, and it could be too far along to treat.
First, and perhaps of greatest interest to U.S. citizens, when a doctor commits malpractice overseas, in most instances it will not be possible to obtain jurisdiction to sue the doctor in an Oregon court. There may be rare circumstances in which a doctor has the contacts with an American jurisdiction required to sue here, but that will be the rare exception. Moreover, even if a patient obtains a judgment in the United States, it may be very difficult to enforce the judgment in a foreign country. Ultimately, a malpractice victim will likely be faced with pursuing a claim abroad.
Most states have case law requiring courts to simultaneously treat those who represent themselves, known as pro se (pronounced “pro say”) litigants by the same standards as a minimally competent attorney. However, they are also usually required to give pro se litigants the benefit of the doubt. This strange double standard can lead to unusual and unpredictable results.
3. Expect that the case will be quick and cheap. Although experienced lawyers will take on viable cases on a “contingency basis”, you will likely be expected to front the costs of initial medical opinion(s) and record gathering. Be prepared for no less than $5,000 and as much as $15,000 to get started. If the investigation is favourable, most lawyers will pay the freight from this point to the end of the case.
With constant improvements in transportation technology, along with massive decreases in the cost of international travel, the old saying that “the world is getting smaller” is truer than ever before. The wealthy have long enjoyed the benefits of international travel, but now “average” Americans can easily travel, too. Moreover, companies like SpaceX and Boeing envision a future in which you can travel almost anywhere in the world in less than an hour.

Finally, in any medical malpractice case -- in any type of lawsuit for that matter -- plaintiffs need to be mindful of time limits for going to court and getting the lawsuit process started. You need to file the initial document (the complaint) within a certain amount of time after you suffered the harm that led to the lawsuit. These deadlines are set by state laws (statutes), so they’re called “statutes of limitations.” In some jurisdictions, the statute of limitations may not begin to run until the discovery of the injury. For example, in California, a patient has three years to file a medical malpractice lawsuit after the harm occurs, or one year after the harm is discovered (whichever comes first).
For example, the Court of Appeals of Texas said in 2006 that the parents of a stillborn baby could sue the Harris County Medical Examiner's Office for causing mental anguish after the office allegedly lost the baby's body during an autopsy. The court said the county's relationship with the parents constituted a "special relationship" under which mental anguish damages were allowable in the absence of physical injury.
Any condition can be misdiagnosed, but there are some that doctors fail to diagnose at a much higher rate than others. Since a great deal of cases of misdiagnosis occur in emergency rooms, many of the commonly misdiagnosed conditions are incredibly serious. Patients who are taken to emergency rooms with symptoms of a heart attack are often told that they are having indigestion or a panic attack. A patient who is having a stroke may be told that his symptoms indicate he is experiencing a bad migraine headache. Doctors can also make mistakes when diagnosing cancer. A doctor may fail to order the appropriate tests or may misread test results and tell the patient that he does not have cancer, when he actually does.

But it doesn’t get much more complex than a medical malpractice case. You’ll need to prove complicated legal and medical issues like the applicable medical standard of care that the doctor should have complied with in your case, and you’ll need to be prepared to refute the other side when they come to the table with their own medical evidence. What’s more, many states require medical malpractice plaintiffs to jump through certain procedural hoops at various points in the case.
Several states have sought to control increasing non-economic awards by implementing compensation caps for these types of damages. Most of these compensation caps directly address medical malpractice issues where malpractice premiums rose to a level to become disincentives for physicians to practice. The tort reform of non-economic damages was intended to ameliorate this situation and protect doctors and health facilities from exorbitant damages. However, advocates against caps argue that caps unduly penalize those victims who may require a level of damages to compensate for lifelong losses that can never be regained.
Copyright 2002-2018. EdgarSnyder.com is sponsored by the Law Offices of Edgar Snyder & Associates®, A Law Firm Representing Injured People. Attorney Edgar Snyder & Associates has offices throughout Western Pennsylvania including locations in: Pittsburgh, Erie, Johnstown, Ebensburg, and Altoona. All of our lawyers are licensed to practice law in the state of Pennsylvania. We also have attorneys licensed to practice law in the states of West Virginia, Ohio, Maryland, and Virginia. Although this website is not intended to solicit clients for matters outside of the states of Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Maryland, and Virginia, if you are injured in an accident, we have relationships with other personal injury attorneys and lawyers throughout the United States.
For your lawsuit to be successful, your Nevada medical malpractice attorney must prove several things. First, your lawyer must show that the defendant (which could be a doctor, nurse, hospital or other person or entity) was negligent when treating you. Then your attorney must demonstrate that this negligence caused an injury. Finally, your lawyer must show that the injury caused damages, for such as physical pain, mental anguish, lost wages and/or additional medical bills.
Expert witnesses, copies of medical records, deposition and witness fees, medical exams -- all of these things cost money. And if you lose your case, you could very well be on the hook for thousands or tens of thousands of dollars in expenses - depending on your legal fee agreement. Is your case important enough to you that you feel the potential financial benefit outweighs the risk?
×